mothernaturenetwork:

This plus-sized duck would provide Copenhagen with clean energyOne part public art installation, one part floating solar farm, Energy Duck is a semi-scary spectacle that generates green power for Denmark’s capital city.

mothernaturenetwork:

This plus-sized duck would provide Copenhagen with clean energy
One part public art installation, one part floating solar farm, Energy Duck is a semi-scary spectacle that generates green power for Denmark’s capital city.

fastcompany:

Boston Is Getting Solar-Powered Park Benches That Charge Your Devices

No longer should we have to beg a block’s worth of bartenders to let us charge our dead phones. What if USB outlets were treated like public property instead?

Thanks to a trio of hardware designers and engineers who generated the idea at the MIT Media Lab, Boston is now turning to cute benches that can charge mobile devices. With 10 already installed in parks across the city in a pilot project, the solar-powered “Soofas” mark a new milestone in smart urban furniture.

Read More>

fennetic:

Joseph Manser examines a pair of perovskite solar cells.

Low Cost Solar Power

Perovskite solar cells have been studied intensely only in the past year and a half. During that time, numerous researchers joined the effort, attracted by these cells’ promise to be inexpensive yet high performing. 

Almost overnight the conversion efficiency of these cells leaped from just a few percent to more than 16% in current versions. Most of the advances were reported in 2012 and 2013. The fast-paced improvement, which hasn’t shown signs of slowing, coupled with inexpensive materials and preparation methods, prompts physicist Henry Snaith to declare that perovskite solar cells are poised “to break the prevailing paradigm” by combining low cost and excellent performance.

Scientists use the term “perovskite” loosely nowadays to refer to a large class of materials that, like CaTiO3, exhibit ABX3 stoichiometry and adopt the perovskite crystal structure. The perovskites rocking the photovoltaics world these days are organometal trihalides, the most commonly studied of which is CH3NH3PbI3. (CH3NH3 is the A group in ABX3.) The main reason for the excitement is the recent steep rate of improvement in perovskite solar-cell performance.

The simplicity of making solar-cell components via liquid-phase chemical reactions and depositing the materials by methods such as spraying and spin coating may make it possible for solar-cell manufacturers to eventually replace clean rooms and sophisticated manufacturing equipment with simple benchtop processes. But even before manufacturers start building production facilities, the simplicity of perovskite solar-cell assembly is attracting many academic researchers. “Anyone can play,” chemistry professor Prashant Kamat says. The barrier to getting started in this field is low, he explains, because this type of research requires only standard lab equipment.

watch the video (and make your own?)

ecowatchorg:

The Solar-Powered Pump System That Could Bring Clean Water to the 800 Million People Without It
An Austrian company hopes to play a large role in ending the water crisis with a technology powered by renewable energy.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/20/solar-pump-clean-water/

ecowatchorg:

The Solar-Powered Pump System That Could Bring Clean Water to the 800 Million People Without It

An Austrian company hopes to play a large role in ending the water crisis with a technology powered by renewable energy.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/20/solar-pump-clean-water/


IBM solar collector magnifies sun by 2,000x (without cooking itself), costs 3x less than similar systems

Concentrating the sun’s ray onto solar photovoltaic (PV) modules requires walking the fine line between optimizing power output and not literally melting your very expensive super-high-efficiency solar cells. A team led by IBM Research seems to have found a way to push back the line. They have created a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns onto hundreds of triple junction photovoltaic chips measuring a single square centimeter each (they even claim to be able to keep temperatures safe up to 5,000x). The trick is that each solar PV cell is cooled using technology developed for supercomputers; microchannels inspired by blood vessels but only a few tens of micrometers in width pipe liquid coolant in and extract heat “10 times more effective than with passive air cooling.”
Waste not
The beauty is that this heat is not just thrown away. This system gets useful work out of it. So while the PV modules are 30%+ efficient at converting the sun’s light into electricity, another 50% of the sun’s energy is captured as heat and can then be used to do things like thermal water desalination and adsorption cooling. This means that the system is capable of converting around 80% of the collected solar energy into useable energy (though the electricity is of course more useful than the thermal energy).
A single collector can produce about 25 kilowatts of electricity. Below is a closeup of some PV cells where the light is being concentrated. Notice the piping to bring the liquid coolant.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_zzE8xMdZc

IBM solar collector magnifies sun by 2,000x (without cooking itself), costs 3x less than similar systems

Concentrating the sun’s ray onto solar photovoltaic (PV) modules requires walking the fine line between optimizing power output and not literally melting your very expensive super-high-efficiency solar cells. A team led by IBM Research seems to have found a way to push back the line. They have created a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns onto hundreds of triple junction photovoltaic chips measuring a single square centimeter each (they even claim to be able to keep temperatures safe up to 5,000x). The trick is that each solar PV cell is cooled using technology developed for supercomputers; microchannels inspired by blood vessels but only a few tens of micrometers in width pipe liquid coolant in and extract heat “10 times more effective than with passive air cooling.”

Waste not

The beauty is that this heat is not just thrown away. This system gets useful work out of it. So while the PV modules are 30%+ efficient at converting the sun’s light into electricity, another 50% of the sun’s energy is captured as heat and can then be used to do things like thermal water desalination and adsorption cooling. This means that the system is capable of converting around 80% of the collected solar energy into useable energy (though the electricity is of course more useful than the thermal energy).

A single collector can produce about 25 kilowatts of electricity. Below is a closeup of some PV cells where the light is being concentrated. Notice the piping to bring the liquid coolant.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_zzE8xMdZc

operation-neo:

Apple now want companies to copy them!

  • Renewable energy powering data centres and manufacturing facilities.
  • Using less packaging
  • Recycled materials making up parts of their products

Hats off to you Apple!
(although Google have been using renewable energy for a while, just saying)

solarpvexchange:

Sanyo Asia Pte Ltd flies high with solar energy - as high as 245m above ground to be precise.A global-leading innovator and manufacturer in environmental technology, SANYO carried out Singapore’s unprecedented and South East Asia’s highest solar panel installation on the roof of 43-storey Ocean Financial Centre, adding yet another laurel to SANYO’s platter of outstanding innovations in the solar panel field. In March 2008, Ocean Financial Centre bagged the Green Mark Platinum Award by BCA in recognition for its eco-friendly office development of the future. A shining example indeed #putsolaronit

solarpvexchange:

Sanyo Asia Pte Ltd flies high with solar energy - as high as 245m above ground to be precise.

A global-leading innovator and manufacturer in environmental technology, SANYO carried out Singapore’s unprecedented and South East Asia’s highest solar panel installation on the roof of 43-storey Ocean Financial Centre, adding yet another laurel to SANYO’s platter of outstanding innovations in the solar panel field. 

In March 2008, Ocean Financial Centre bagged the Green Mark Platinum Award by BCA in recognition for its eco-friendly office development of the future. A shining example indeed 

#putsolaronit

dakwaarde:

How to increase the use of solar energy? By design! 

dakwaarde:

How to increase the use of solar energy? By design! 

staff:

HQ Update: Week 371

Tim Wu (internet good guy and candidate for lieutenant governor of New York State) spoke to us about net neutrality and the legal implications of a robot takeover. Our data center is powered in part by the big yellow sun. Sales flapped their USA flag, and the USA advanced accordingly. More ponging this week, this time with pizza.

Bonus: Two of the ping-pong balls are different from all the others. Can you spot them? 

Tumblr goes solar :) 

fastinfastout:

Solar carport charges your electric car. This is how it’s done.

fastinfastout:

Solar carport charges your electric car. This is how it’s done.